#!/bin/bash
#
#
# rc.single     This file is executed by init when it goes into runlevel
#               1, which is the administrative state. It kills all
#               deamons and then puts the system into single user mode.
#               Note that the file systems are kept mounted.
#
# Author:       Miquel van Smoorenburg, 
#               Modified for RHS Linux by Damien Neil
#

. /etc/init.d/functions

if [ "$1" != "start" ]; then
   exit 0
fi

rm -f /var/lock/subsys/*

# this looks nicer
[ -x /usr/bin/clear ] && /usr/bin/clear

# make sure modprobe is working
if [ -f /proc/sys/kernel/modprobe ]; then
	sysctl -w kernel.modprobe="/sbin/modprobe" >/dev/null 2>&1
fi

# If they want to run something in single user mode, might as well run it...
for i in /etc/rc1.d/S[0-9][0-9]* ; do
	# Check if the script is there.
	[ -x "$i" ] || continue

	# Reject backup files and files generated by rpm.
	case "$1" in
		*.rpmsave|*.rpmorig|*.rpmnew|*~|*.orig)
			continue;;
	esac
	[ "$i" = "/etc/rc1.d/S00single" ] && continue
	$i start
done

# Now go to the single user level.
echo $"Telling INIT to go to single user mode."
exec init -t1 S